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20110301
20110301
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for -- working for the u.s. government essentially, then the private side, those workers, it was incumbent upon them, what they asked for, they didn't want to ask for so much they were going to break the company they worked for because they'd be out of luck and out of a job, but the public side doesn't have that same kind of relationship. >> no. the relationship between the public sector worker union is with a politician on the other side of the negotiating fence. in the private sector, it's a private sector union person negotiating with a corporate boss for wages and benefits and pensions, and the two are very different. the corporation must rely on profits, the politician relies on the taxpayer and tax revenue. a very different kettle of fish, with very different outcomes as we can see today. martha: that's a tricky marriage, so to speak, as we watch this all unfold. stuart varney from the fox business network and varney & co. bill: back to this weather, flooding and tornadoes leaving a path of destruction in the midwest, we watched this live during our program yesterday. this is flooding in
. in about 40 minutes, u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, speaks with reporters at the white house. and in about an hour, british prime minister david cameron on why his government's actions on libya. on "washington journal," we will talk about federal spending with democratic representative marcia fudge of ohio, and republican senator mark kirk of illinois. and then we will speak with an ambassador. "washington journal" is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> you are watching c-span bringing politics and public affairs. >> you are watching c-span, bringing you politics and public affairs. every morning it is "washington journal," our live call-in program about the news of the day, connecting you with elected officials, policymakers, and journalists. weekdays, watch live coverage of the u.s. house, and on weeknights, congressional hearings and policy forums. also supreme court oral arguments. on the weekends, you can see our signature interview programs. on saturdays, "the communicators," and on sundays, "newsmakers," "q&a," and prime minister's questions from the british house
at no expense to the u.s. taxpayer. this bill, which passed the house by voice vote last congress, commemorates the creation of a unique form of service that creates peace through people-to-people diplomacy. it doesn't cost the taxpayers a single pennyism urge my congressional colleagues to honor america's commitment to peace by having swift passage of this timely legislation. today as we mark this significant milestone in america's history, i urge each of you to join me in honoring your constituents who have served in and are supporting the peace corps funding so that we can usher in the next generation of americans who want to serve this country. i yield back the remainder of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. murphy. mr. murphy: mr. speaker, currently u.s. families spend about $1 billion per day on imported oil. we import about 1.6 billion barrels from politically unstable nations with corresponding instability in prices. which influence our dollars, our economy, and sometimes our soldiers having to look at defending these areas. now,
capitol hill, laying out u.s. options. >> we have joined the libyan people in demanding that gadhafi must go. >> reporter: critics question whether that's enough. >> it's difficult to look at the initial u.s. response to the unrest in libya and think of any word other than tepid. >> we feel that we did this in a prudent and effective manner. and we did it in a way that did not raise the alarm bells around the region and the world that we were about to invade for oil. >> reporter: the pentagon is working up contingencies from aid to intervention. none of them envision moammar gadhafi giving up. >> all i can say is sometimes you have to actually listen to what people say, and he says he's not leaving. >> reporter: they insist all the options are on the table, though a no-fly zone seems to be falling out of favor. >> it would be a military operation. it wouldn't simply be telling people not to fly arms. >> reporter: that's the kind of force nato and the united nations so far have been unwilling to back. for now, the united states is positioning forces in the region, prepari
government continues to threaten until libyans. >> secretary clinton says the u.s. has frozen at least $30 billion in libyan assets and plans to send in humanitarian aid. it is also exploring the idea of a no-fly zone over libya to prevent bomb attacks. >> the un is playing a huge role in the uprising sweeping across the middle east and africa. it is providing up-to-date information and help and better organized protesters. our social networking sites agents of change? some say not exactly. >> we may be entering into a phase where social media is in a sense of democratizing tool, because of nothing else, it will make their government's more aware of what people think. >> in many countries, the internet is easy to access and difficult to control. the governments of egypt and libya both cut off access to the ever -- to the internet. people just cannot seem to get enough of charlie sheen, or maybe they are just waiting to hear what comes out of his mouth next. you listen and you judge. >> i am tired of pretending like i am not special. people cannot figure me out or process me. >> he also con
the eastern half of the country. increasingly the u.s. and nato seem more comfortable doing business with this man, mustafa al jaleel, now tasked with forming a government. he said he needs one favor from the west -- a no-fly zone. [ speaking in a foreign language ] >> reporter: we want an air space embargo to keep gadhafi from bringing in mercenaries from africa. we'll do the rest. ratcheting up pressure on gadhafi, secretary of state clinton said a no-fly zone is on the table. >> the people of libya made themselves clear. it is time for gadhafi to go. now without further violence or delay. >> reporter: gadhafi is not listening. civil war seems imminent and the exodus of thousands of refugees along libya's borders every day will likely only grow. still, it doesn't have to be bloody. libya experts say if several of gadhafi's inner circle decide tole bolt the game is over. so far, meredith, that hasn't happened. back to you. >> jim maceda, thank you very much. susan wright is the ambassador to the united nations. >> good morning, meredith. >> you have called gadhafi delusional and dis
for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 230, the -- e speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 241, the nays are 179 the previous -- are 179. the previous question is ordered. the question is on the adoption of the resolion. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the preponderance of the chair, the ayes have it. >> mr. speaker, on that i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having risen, the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes bylectronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the nationalaptioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of reprentatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 251. the nays are 170. once again on this vote teas are 25
, mr. speaker, and my colleagues, that's not what american, good old u.s.a. medicine is all about. it's time, quality time spent with that doctor and maybe no prescriptions. and i yield back. ms. hayworth: it is precisely and thank you precisely the point that i'm agreeing on with you and we have all been driven to philosophically, we need to have solutions that empower our doctors, our patients and our providers to do all of them, to have the best and to do the best and consumer-based solutions are possible. our doctor's caucus is working hard on providing those ideas, real liability reform, which has to be part of this. we cannot possibly continue as we have been. that was a glarring omission from the a.c.a. but in addition, we need to recognize and appreciate and act upon the knowledge that our medical care can cost less. we do need to pay teaning to costs, but we need to pay attention to our doctors, providers, to use their best judgment, not empower something like the independent payment advisory board to make those decisions for us. that is a very dangerous thing and something t
or five others. there is one in china that alarms and that list. the u.s. is way ahead and that and that took many, many decades to develop that. it is a combination of our very best students who have done well and smart people from all over the world who have wanted to come to these universities, both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. our net imports i ofq into this country has been a huge advantage. there is no other country that has had that. that is not quite as powerful in some ways. we make it hard sometimes for those people either to come in or stay. it is still a mind-blowing pingree we need to double down on that. -- it is still in mind blowing thing. we need to double down on that. is that element of support going to be there for those institutions? whenever people tell you about the overseas school systems that are very good, take it with the grain of salt. there is a temptation for them to tell you about the part that is good and not tell you about the full story. it is hard to run a good education system. nobody has a perfect education system and th
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9